Six Reasons Why You’re Not Sleeping Well

 

 

Sleep plays an important role in how we get through the days. It assists with weight management and hormonal balance, motivation, and concentration, and ultimately contributes to how we feel throughout the day.

 

There are a lot of different factors that could be impacting your quality of sleep, some more obvious than others. Here are six reasons why you may not be sleeping well, and what to do about it.

 

Old Mattress

 

One of the main reasons you may not be sleeping well is your mattress. Even the most durable mattresses break down over time, and if it’s been a while since your last upgrade, it could be time to go shopping.

 

Lots of people choose the wrong kind of mattress for lifestyle and sleep style as well. Your needs may differ based on if you’re a back or side sleeper. Athletes and those with sleep apnea could benefit from an adjustable bed (read more at https://reverie.com/). Try rotating your mattress if you haven’t in some time. If that doesn’t help, start looking for something new.

 

Poor Environment

 

The ideal sleep environment is dark, quiet, and cool. It should be warm enough to fall asleep comfortably, but not so warm that you get overheated in the middle of the night. Research has shown that even a bit of light can cause disruption to your natural sleep rhythms and that noise can wake you up without your remembering the next day.

 

Create an environment for optimal rest. Invest in blackout curtains and a fan or noise machine. If you need a light on, wear an eye mask to block it out.

 

Hormones

 

There are a lot of ways that hormones can impact sleep and vice versa. Females, in particular, face a lot of challenges in this arena. Progesterone and estrogen fluctuations throughout their cycle can cause fatigue and restlessness, exacerbated after childbirth and leading up to menopause.

 

It’s important to try and get sleep when and where you can, such as sneaking in a power nap after work. If sleep doesn’t seem to be an option, stay away from screens and focus on having relaxation time, by meditating or reading a book. If nothing improves, talk to a medical professional.

 

Screens and Circadian Rhythms

 

On the subject of screens, you may have heard that blue light from technology can impact the ability to sleep. This is because it creates a false reaction that changes our melatonin levels and natural circadian rhythms.

 

Avoid screens an hour before bedtime and an hour after waking up. Not only will this help improve your sleep, but also your productivity levels in the morning. Consider setting your phone across the room, and get out of bed to turn off your alarm in the morning. In other words, make the snooze button your enemy.

 

Stress

 

Stress can impact sleep in two ways: keeping you up at night thinking about the problem and impacting your hormones. It’s important to remember when you go to bed that there’s nothing you can do about the problem at this time, so there’s no point in losing sleep over it.

 

Practice a mindfulness routine that allows you to move past stressful thoughts and clear your mind. Find ways to disconnect from the stress in the evening, whether it’s an escape through reading or going for a run before bed.

 

Exercising

 

A lack of exercise can contribute to a lack of sleep, but for some, exercising too close to bedtime can be the problem. While you might feel tired after an intense workout in the evening, your body might rebound and become energized around the time you’re ready to settle. Try shifting your workout to the morning. You’ll be up anyway because you won’t be able to reach your snooze button, right?

 

It might take some time to identify what’s contributing to your poor sleep, as there may be multiple factors to consider. Take note of what you’re trying and how you feel to find what works for you.

Six Reasons Why You’re Not Sleeping Well

 

Sleep plays an important role in how we get through the days. It assists with weight management and hormonal balance, motivation, and concentration, and ultimately contributes to how we feel throughout the day.

 

There are a lot of different factors that could be impacting your quality of sleep, some more obvious than others. Here are six reasons why you may not be sleeping well, and what to do about it.

 

Old Mattress

 

One of the main reasons you may not be sleeping well is your mattress. Even the most durable mattresses break down over time, and if it’s been a while since your last upgrade, it could be time to go shopping.

 

Lots of people choose the wrong kind of mattress for lifestyle and sleep style as well. Your needs may differ based on if you’re a back or side sleeper. Athletes and those with sleep apnea could benefit from an adjustable bed (read more at https://reverie.com/). Try rotating your mattress if you haven’t in some time. If that doesn’t help, start looking for something new.

 

Poor Environment

 

The ideal sleep environment is dark, quiet, and cool. It should be warm enough to fall asleep comfortably, but not so warm that you get overheated in the middle of the night. Research has shown that even a bit of light can cause disruption to your natural sleep rhythms and that noise can wake you up without your remembering the next day.

 

Create an environment for optimal rest. Invest in blackout curtains and a fan or noise machine. If you need a light on, wear an eye mask to block it out.

 

Hormones

 

There are a lot of ways that hormones can impact sleep and vice versa. Females, in particular, face a lot of challenges in this arena. Progesterone and estrogen fluctuations throughout their cycle can cause fatigue and restlessness, exacerbated after childbirth and leading up to menopause.

 

It’s important to try and get sleep when and where you can, such as sneaking in a power nap after work. If sleep doesn’t seem to be an option, stay away from screens and focus on having relaxation time, by meditating or reading a book. If nothing improves, talk to a medical professional.

 

Screens and Circadian Rhythms

 

On the subject of screens, you may have heard that blue light from technology can impact the ability to sleep. This is because it creates a false reaction that changes our melatonin levels and natural circadian rhythms.

 

Avoid screens an hour before bedtime and an hour after waking up. Not only will this help improve your sleep, but also your productivity levels in the morning. Consider setting your phone across the room, and get out of bed to turn off your alarm in the morning. In other words, make the snooze button your enemy.

 

Stress

 

Stress can impact sleep in two ways: keeping you up at night thinking about the problem and impacting your hormones. It’s important to remember when you go to bed that there’s nothing you can do about the problem at this time, so there’s no point in losing sleep over it.

 

Practice a mindfulness routine that allows you to move past stressful thoughts and clear your mind. Find ways to disconnect from the stress in the evening, whether it’s an escape through reading or going for a run before bed.

 

Exercising

 

A lack of exercise can contribute to a lack of sleep, but for some, exercising too close to bedtime can be the problem. While you might feel tired after an intense workout in the evening, your body might rebound and become energized around the time you’re ready to settle. Try shifting your workout to the morning. You’ll be up anyway because you won’t be able to reach your snooze button, right?

 

It might take some time to identify what’s contributing to your poor sleep, as there may be multiple factors to consider. Take note of what you’re trying and how you feel to find what works for you.

 

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