Mental Health Awareness Month: Most Common Types of Depression in Men

 

Every year, millions of people face the realities of living with a mental illness. The term mental illness carries a great deal of stigma, but the fact that many people fail to talk about these issues doesn’t make them any less real. Anxiety disorders are the most common form of mental illness in the United States and nearly half of those who have an anxiety disorder also have depression.

Depression is a mood disorder that causes emotional, cognitive, and physical symptoms like persistent feelings of sadness and loss of interest. May is Mental Health Awareness Month and it’s the perfect time to learn about common issues like depression and to take a greater interest in your own mental health.

How Common is Depression in Men?

People with depression often struggle to complete normal day-to-day activities and may feel as if life is no longer worth living.

In 2017 alone, approximately 17.3 million adults in the United States suffered at least one major depressive episode, including 6.3 million men. Not only is depression common, but studies show men are less likely to seek treatment for mental health problems than women.

The 5 Most Common Types of Depression

Though depression affects millions of people each year, it affects them in different ways. Clinical diagnoses are made based on specific symptoms as well as their frequency and severity.

The five most common types of depression in men are as follows:

  • Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) – A type of depression that follows a seasonal pattern, typically increasing in severity during the fall and winter with remission in the spring or summer. SAD affects about 5% of the U.S. population with symptoms present about 40% of the year.
  • Persistent Depressive Disorder – Formerly known as dysthymic disorder, this condition is characterized by chronic low-level depression and affects about 1.5% of U.S. adults.
  • Psychotic DepressionBetween 5% and 25% of depression patients experience a severe mental disorder characterized by symptoms of depression accompanied by psychosis.
  • Minor DepressionUp to 16% of adults experience symptoms of depression but at a lesser severity and for shorter duration than major depression.
  • Bipolar Disorder (BPD) – Though technically not a type of depression, BPD can cause dramatic shifts in mood, energy, and the ability to function. An estimated 4.4% of adults experience bipolar disorder during their lives.

Men are particularly reluctant to talk about mental health issues, especially when paired with accompanying issues like erectile dysfunction, but they are no less affected by them. Even celebrities like Dwayne Johnson and Michael Phelps have spoken publicly about their struggles with depression, anxiety, and suicidal thoughts. Take your mental health seriously and be an advocate for yourself in seeking help if you experience symptoms of depression or other mental health issues.

Mental Health Awareness Month: Most Common Types of Depression in Men

Every year, millions of people face the realities of living with a mental illness. The term mental illness carries a great deal of stigma, but the fact that many people fail to talk about these issues doesn’t make them any less real. Anxiety disorders are the most common form of mental illness in the United States and nearly half of those who have an anxiety disorder also have depression.

Depression is a mood disorder that causes emotional, cognitive, and physical symptoms like persistent feelings of sadness and loss of interest. May is Mental Health Awareness Month and it’s the perfect time to learn about common issues like depression and to take a greater interest in your own mental health.

How Common is Depression in Men?

People with depression often struggle to complete normal day-to-day activities and may feel as if life is no longer worth living.

In 2017 alone, approximately 17.3 million adults in the United States suffered at least one major depressive episode, including 6.3 million men. Not only is depression common, but studies show men are less likely to seek treatment for mental health problems than women.

The 5 Most Common Types of Depression

Though depression affects millions of people each year, it affects them in different ways. Clinical diagnoses are made based on specific symptoms as well as their frequency and severity.

The five most common types of depression in men are as follows:

  • Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) – A type of depression that follows a seasonal pattern, typically increasing in severity during the fall and winter with remission in the spring or summer. SAD affects about 5% of the U.S. population with symptoms present about 40% of the year.
  • Persistent Depressive Disorder – Formerly known as dysthymic disorder, this condition is characterized by chronic low-level depression and affects about 1.5% of U.S. adults.
  • Psychotic DepressionBetween 5% and 25% of depression patients experience a severe mental disorder characterized by symptoms of depression accompanied by psychosis.
  • Minor DepressionUp to 16% of adults experience symptoms of depression but at a lesser severity and for shorter duration than major depression.
  • Bipolar Disorder (BPD) – Though technically not a type of depression, BPD can cause dramatic shifts in mood, energy, and the ability to function. An estimated 4.4% of adults experience bipolar disorder during their lives.

Men are particularly reluctant to talk about mental health issues, especially when paired with accompanying issues like erectile dysfunction, but they are no less affected by them. Even celebrities like Dwayne Johnson and Michael Phelps have spoken publicly about their struggles with depression, anxiety, and suicidal thoughts. Take your mental health seriously and be an advocate for yourself in seeking help if you experience symptoms of depression or other mental health issues.

Mental Health Awareness Month: Most Common Types of Depression in Men

Every year, millions of people face the realities of living with a mental illness. The term mental illness carries a great deal of stigma, but the fact that many people fail to talk about these issues doesn’t make them any less real. Anxiety disorders are the most common form of mental illness in the United States and nearly half of those who have an anxiety disorder also have depression.

Depression is a mood disorder that causes emotional, cognitive, and physical symptoms like persistent feelings of sadness and loss of interest. May is Mental Health Awareness Month and it’s the perfect time to learn about common issues like depression and to take a greater interest in your own mental health.

How Common is Depression in Men?

People with depression often struggle to complete normal day-to-day activities and may feel as if life is no longer worth living.

In 2017 alone, approximately 17.3 million adults in the United States suffered at least one major depressive episode, including 6.3 million men. Not only is depression common, but studies show men are less likely to seek treatment for mental health problems than women.

The 5 Most Common Types of Depression

Though depression affects millions of people each year, it affects them in different ways. Clinical diagnoses are made based on specific symptoms as well as their frequency and severity.

The five most common types of depression in men are as follows:

  • Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) – A type of depression that follows a seasonal pattern, typically increasing in severity during the fall and winter with remission in the spring or summer. SAD affects about 5% of the U.S. population with symptoms present about 40% of the year.
  • Persistent Depressive Disorder – Formerly known as dysthymic disorder, this condition is characterized by chronic low-level depression and affects about 1.5% of U.S. adults.
  • Psychotic DepressionBetween 5% and 25% of depression patients experience a severe mental disorder characterized by symptoms of depression accompanied by psychosis.
  • Minor DepressionUp to 16% of adults experience symptoms of depression but at a lesser severity and for shorter duration than major depression.
  • Bipolar Disorder (BPD) – Though technically not a type of depression, BPD can cause dramatic shifts in mood, energy, and the ability to function. An estimated 4.4% of adults experience bipolar disorder during their lives.

Men are particularly reluctant to talk about mental health issues, especially when paired with accompanying issues like erectile dysfunction, but they are no less affected by them. Even celebrities like Dwayne Johnson and Michael Phelps have spoken publicly about their struggles with depression, anxiety, and suicidal thoughts. Take your mental health seriously and be an advocate for yourself in seeking help if you experience symptoms of depression or other mental health issues.

 

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